Sample Physical Education Standards-Based Lessons

Lesson Example from our Standards-Based Physical Education Curriculum

Grade 5 - Cooperative Activities

Unit Level Standards

1.0 - Demonstrates control using the mature form for jumping and running.
2.1 - Explains that whole/part, accuracy/speed, mass/distributed, and mental/physical are four different ways to organize motor skill practice.
2.2 - States Newton's First Law.
2.3 - Describes game tactics in a cooperative game setting.
2.4 - Describes the changes related to physical performance that occur in the human body from prepuberty through puberty.
2.5 - Describes the critical elements for jumping and running.
3.1 - Engages in moderate physical activity for 20 minutes 3 days each week.
3.2 - Lists extracurricular physical activities available before the school day.
4.1 - Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
4.2 - Describes the elements of a cool-down.
5.1 - Contributes ideas and listens with empathy to the ideas of everyone in a cooperative activity..
5.2 - Follows rules for cooperative activities.
6.1 - Describes the development of physical education in the United States during the 17th and 18th century. [5.8]
6.2 - Expresses personal feelings during cooperative activities.
6.3 - Chooses to engage in skill competencies found in cooperative activities at a level that leads to personal satisfaction, success, and enjoyment.
6.4 - Describes the short-term muscular strength benefits derived from participation in physical activity.

Lesson Plan

State Newton's first law. 2.2

An object at rest remains at rest until acted upon by an outside force. An object in motion remains in motion until acted upon by an outside force.

Have students write down Newton's first law in their notebook. 2.2

Review rules and procedures for cooperative activities. 5.2

Listen when the teacher is talking.
Understand the task before starting.
Follow all game rules.
Pay attention when spotting or helping another student.
Respect yourself and others during all activities.
Treat equipment and facilities with care.
Listen when another member of your group is talking.

Have students perform a warm-up along with a cardiorespiratory workout. (assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Explain Bottoms Up and show students the task card. 5.1, 2.2, 5.2

Explain how Newton's first law relates to Bottoms Up. 2.2

More force is required to move a stationary object.
Force is needed to push against partner's feet.
Force is needed to raise bottom off ground.
The force comes from the muscles.

Have students brainstorm how to maintain balance when working with a partner. 2.2

Have students participate in Bottoms Up. (assessment opportunity: structured observation 5.1, 5.2, 6.3)

Explain Inchworm and show students the task card. 5.1, 2.2, 5.2

Explain how Newton's first law relates to Inchworm. 2.2

More force is required to move a stationary object.
Force is needed to move the bodies.
The force comes from the muscles.

Have students participate in Inchworm. (assessment opportunity: structured observation 5.1, 5.2, 6.3)

Lead students through a cool-down and flexibility exercises appropriate to the physical activity level of the lesson. (assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Debrief each activity. 5.1

What did you try?
What was the result?
What would you do different next time?
How did you communicated with your classmates?
How did you show empathy?

Introduce physical education during the 17th and 18th centuries in the United States. 6.1

Education in early Colonial America was left to parents.
Health and physical education were not included in the curriculum since the frontier society did not appreciate or understand their value.
The idea of physical education as an essential part of American education was not considered until Noah Webster presented his views on the positive effects of physical education in 1790. Then, physical education programs began to reflect the various cultures where immigrants originated, especially Germany and Sweden.
Physical education has focused on different aspects at different times throughout history.

Have students research and write a comparison between physical education during the late 18th century and today. (Assessment assignment opportunity: report 6.1)

 

Grade 6 - Cooperative Unit - Lesson 1

Unit Level Standards

1.0 - Demonstrates the mature form for static and dynamic balance, running and changing directions, and jumping in coordination with others.
2.1 - Explains the purpose of feedback.
2.2 - States Newton's Third Law.
2.3 - Designs a cooperative movement game that requires locomotor skills and object manipulation.
[2.12] Develop a cooperative movement game that uses locomotor skills, object manipulation, and an offensive strategy and teach the game to another person.
2.4 - Describes the importance of early adolescents participating in cooperative activities.
2.5 - Not applicable
3.1 - Engages in moderate and vigorous physical activity for 60 minutes (at least five minutes of vigorous activity) 5 days each week.
[3.4] Participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity a minimum of four days each week.
3.2 - Lists physical activity opportunities in the local community.
4.1 - Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
[3.2] Compare individual physical fitness results with research-based standards for good health.
[3.3] Develop individual goals for each of the components of health-related physical fitness (muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility, aerobic capacity, and body composition).
[4.7] Compile and analyze a log noting the food intake/calories consumed and energy expended through physical activity. - analyze
4.2 - Describes an effective cool down.
[4.1] Distinguish between effective and ineffective warm-up and cool-down techniques.
5.1 - Demonstrates cooperative skills with a partner.
5.2 - Follows procedures for safe participation when working with a small group in cooperative activities.
[5.2] Evaluate individual responsibility in group efforts.
6.1 - Describes physical education in the Ancient World.
6.2 - Not applicable
6.3 - Chooses to engage in new cooperative activities.
6.4 - Defines health benefits.

Lesson

Display the posters - Software for curriculum includes a series of posters for each unit.

Instruct students to examine the results of their fitness assessment and food/activity logs, and to set goals for improvement for each of the five areas of health-related fitness. Students should record their goals in the Health-Related Fitness Portfolio and write an essay comparing their fitness results with research-based standards and analyzing their food and energy log. (Assessment opportunity: goal setting 4.1 [3.3], essay [3.2, 4.7])

Goal setting should be based on a comparison of pretest scores to standards.
Setting goals leads to greater improvement.
Goals should be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely.
Monitoring progress leads to greater improvement.
Setting goals along with regular self-assessment makes it easier for students to see the things they are doing well.
Performing warm-up activities;, flexibility, muscular endurance/strength, and cardiorespiratory endurance exercises according to FITT guidelines; and cooling down leads to greater improvement.

Introduce the unit.

Explain that students will be experiencing new activities daily. 6.3

Discuss safety during cooperative activities. 5.2

Listen when the teacher is talking.
Understand the task before starting.
Follow all game rules.
Pay attention when spotting or helping another student.
Respect yourself and others during all activities.
Treat equipment and facilities with care.
Listen when another member of your group is talking.

Describe what is needed (e.g., cooperation) in order to be successful at these activities. 5.1

A cooperative game requires players to work together for a common goal.
There is at least one means of scoring or completing the task.
Game tactics in a cooperative game involve working together as a group, brainstorming possible solutions, trying the solutions that seem to have the best possibility of solving the problem, and arriving at the best possible solution.

Have students perform a warm-up along with a cardiorespiratory workout. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1) - Software for curriculum includes a wide variety of exercises from which to choose.

Teach students the rules for Interest Circle. 2.3, 6.3 [2.12]

Have students play Interest Circle; instructing them focus only on physical activity interests. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 5.1, 5.2, 6.3) - Software for curriculum has task cards for each skill and activity.

Whole class activity.
Form a circle.
The teacher is the first leader.
The teacher walks across the circle stating something he/she has done (e.g., climbed a mountain, swam in the ocean).
Everyone else who has done the same thing also walks across the circle to the other side.
The person currently to the teacher's right is the next person to walk out and state something he/she has done.
Continue having the person to the right side of the previous leader become the new leader.
Continue the game until everyone has had a turn as the leader or time is up.

Describe an appropriate cool-down. 4.2 [4.1]

Cool-down occurs at the end of the exercise period and consists of slowly decreasing body temperature.
Cool-down also consists of static stretching.

Have students record the elements of an appropriate cool-down in their notebooks. 4.2 [4.1]

Lead students through a cool-down and flexibility exercises appropriate to the physical activity level of the lesson. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Debrief the activity, including a discussing on the role of cooperation in being successful at cooperative activities. 5.1

 

Grade 7 - Tumbling/Gymnastics

Unit Level Standards

1.0 - Demonstrates the mature form for: long horse vaulting (straddle dismount from croup, straddle vault); vaulting (squat vault; pommels (jump front support, hand walk, leg cut); floor exercises (front walkover, back extension); balance beam (straddle support mount, walk with dip, squat turn, jump dismount); horizontal bar (knee hang, front pullover, penny drop, forward hip circle); and parallel bars (forward hand walk, half-turn, back hand walk, forward hand jump, swing a straight-arm support, series of straddle seats, front dismount from straight-arm support).
2.1 - Describes what needs to be considered when setting effective goals.
2.2 - Explains how force can be used to make the body rotate in tumbling/gymnastics.
2.3 - Explains the elements of an individual sport.
2.4 - Define individual differences in terms of physical performance.
2.5 - Explains the critical elements of: long horse vaulting (straddle dismount from croup, straddle vault); vaulting (squat vault; pommels (jump front support, hand walk, leg cut); floor exercises (front walkover, back extension); balance beam (straddle support mount, walk with dip, squat turn, jump dismount); horizontal bar (knee hang, front pullover, penny drop, forward hip circle); and parallel bars (forward hand walk, half-turn, back hand walk, forward hand jump, swing a straight-arm support, series of straddle seats, front dismount from straight-arm support).
3.1 - Engages in moderate and vigorous physical activity for 60 minutes 5 days each week.
3.2 - Describes opportunities in the larger community for participation in tumbling and gymnastics activities.
4.1 - Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
4.2 - Creates a 1-week flexibility plan.
5.1 - Applies problem-solving techniques when working with another person in tumbling activities.
5.2 - Accepts responsibility for individual improvement during tumbling and gymnastics activities.
6.1 - Describes recreational activities during medieval times.
6.2 - Appreciates one's own stylistic approach to creating a tumbling or gymnastics routine.
6.3 - Chooses to engage in tumbling and gymnastics activities at the appropriate level of personal challenge.
6.4 - Explains that in many societies physical activity is a shared intergenerational experience.

Lesson Plan

Define individual differences in terms of physical performance. 2.4

Physical attributes (height, weight, limb length, body type, skill-related fitness, health-related fitness) can affect one's performance of physical activities.

Have students record the information in their notebooks. 2.4

Have students perform a warm-up along with a cardiorespiratory workout. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Review the new stunts (tripod, back shoulder roll, walk on beam, and switcheroo). 1.0, 2.5

[Task cards and directions come with the curriculum]

Have students rotate through these stations: floor exercise, transitions (V-sit); floor exercise, transitions (L-support); floor exercise, forward sequence (log roll); floor exercise, forward sequence (front shoulder roll); floor exercise, backward sequence (back shoulder roll); floor exercise, headstand sequence (Trust Fall); floor exercise, headstand sequence (tripod); floor exercise, handstand sequence (switcheroo); beam (walking); and computer (Biomechanics Made Easy - rotation section). (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 1.0, 5.1, 5.2, 6.3)

Lead students through a cool-down and flexibility exercises appropriate to the physical activity level of the lesson. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Grade 8 - Volleyball - Lesson 17

Unit Level Standards

1.0 - Demonstrates the mature form for forearm pass, underhand serve, overhand pass, overhand serve, standing spike, jumping spike, and block.
2.1 - Applies transfer of learning to the learning of skills used in net sports.
2.2 - Explains the impact of air resistance on skill performance.
2.3 - Explains offensive and defensive strategies for net sports.
2.4 - Describes how longer limbs provide better leverage if accompanied by increases in strength.
2.5 - Explains the critical elements of forearm pass, underhand serve, overhand pass, overhand serve, standing spike, jumping spike, and block.
3.1 - Engages in moderate and vigorous physical activity for 60 minutes 6 days each week based on personal goals.
3.2 - Explains ways to exercise while playing video games.
4.1 - Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
4.2 - Creates a 2-week muscular endurance and muscular strength plan.
5.1 - Collaborates with team members to solve problems during nets sports.
5.2 - Accepts responsibility for one's own actions and decisions during net sports.
6.1 - Describes nets sports in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries.
6.2 - Not applicable
6.3 - Chooses to engage in net sports at the appropriate level of social, physical, and emotional challenge.
6.4 - Describes the psychological benefits derived from regular participation in physical activity.

Lesson Plan

Review open and closed space. 2.3

Discuss the relationship between open space to closed space for invasion team sports to net sports. 2.3

Demonstrate the basic defensive position. 1.0, 2.5

Have students perform a warm-up along with muscular strength and muscular endurance exercises. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Provide students with feedback as they assume the basic defensive position. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 1.0, 5.2, 6.3)

Demonstrate the basic rotation. 2.3

Provide students with feedback as they assume positions on the court and walk through the basic rotation. 2.3

Have the center front toss the ball to the back row so that their team can attempt to execute a pass and set and spike sequence. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 1.0, 5.2, 6.3

Lead students through a cool-down and flexibility exercises appropriate to the physical activity level of the lesson. (Assessment opportunity: structured observation 4.1)

Collect essay on transfer of learning. (Assessment opportunity: essay) 2.1

Grade 9 - Fitness - Lesson 8

Unit Level Standards

3.1 Participates in moderate to vigorous physical activities at least four days each week.
3.2 Lists available fitness resources in the community.
4.1 Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
4.2 Develops a one-month personal physical fitness plan.
5.2 Accepts personal responsibility to create and maintain a physically and emotionally safe and non-threatening environment for physical activity.
6.1 Describes the historical trends in physical fitness and their impact on physical fitness today.
6.3 Describes the enjoyment, self-expression, challenge, multiculturalism, and social benefits experienced by achieving one's best in physical activities.
6.4 Explains the role of physical activity in the prevention of disease and the reduction of health care costs.

Lesson Plan

Review (from previous grade levels) the definition of flexibility. 4.2

Review (from previous grade levels) the FITT concepts related to flexibility. 4.2

Review (from previous grade levels) the general principles for determining which muscle is being stretched during a flexibility exercise. Typically the muscle above a joint is the one being stretched. 4.2

Lead students in a warm-up followed by aerobic exercise. 4.1

Have students rotate through the following stations: 4.1/4.2

1. Match muscle names to muscles
2. Perform arm lift, lower back stretch, and neck stretch
3. Match bone names to bones
4. Review dangerous exercises on Health Related Fitness software
5. Pick one dangerous exercises and discuss with group members why it is dangerous
6. Perform calf stretch, deltoid stretch, and back saver sit and reach
7. Review muscle names, function, location, and exercises using Muscle Flash
8. Match dangerous exercises to safe exercises.

At each station, have students record the name of the exercise and the muscle being stretched.

Lead students in flexibility exercises and a cool-down. 4.1

Review the muscle being stretch in each exercise. 4.2

 

Grade 9 - Tennis - Lesson 11

Unit Level Standards

1.0 Demonstrates proficiency for specialized skills and combinations during tennis.
Combine and apply movement patterns, simple to complex, in tennis. [1.1]
Demonstrate proficiency in forehand drive, backhand drive, serve, volley, lob, and smash. [1.2]
Demonstrate advanced offensive, defensive, and transition strategies in tennis. [1.4]
2.1 Creates a practice plan for tennis.
Analyze and evaluate feedback from proprioception, from others, and from the performance of complex motor (movement) activities to improve performance in tennis. [1.7]
Create and/or modify practice/training plans based on evaluative feedback of skill acquisition and performance in tennis. [1.9]
Develop personal goals to improve one's performance in physical activities. [3.5]
2.2 Explains the use of biomechanics principles in tennis.
Explain the use of the principles of biomechanics (leverage, force, inertia, rotary motion, opposition, and buoyancy); apply the principles to achieve advanced performance in tennis; and evaluate the performance based on the use of the principles. [1.5]
2.3 Explains advanced offensive, defensive, and transition strategies in tennis. [1.4]
2.4 Explains the skill-related components that enhance performance levels in tennis.
Identify, explain, and apply the skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination, explosive power and speed that enhance performance levels in tennis. [1.3]
2.5 Analyzes performance strategies for improved performance in tennis.
Analyze situations and determine appropriate performance strategies for improved performance in tennis. [1.10]
Analyze and explain which training and conditioning practices have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and performance in tennis. [1.8]
Assess the effect/outcome of a particular performance strategy in tennis. [1.11]
3.1 Participates in moderate to vigorous physical activities at least four days each week. [2.1]
4.1 Works toward a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
Improve and maintain physical fitness by adjusting physical activity levels to meet the principles of exercise. [2.5]
Participate in enjoyable and challenging physical activities that develop and maintain the five components of physical fitness. [2.2]
5.2 Accepts personal responsibility to create and maintain a physically and emotionally safe and non-threatening environment for physical activity. [3.1]
6.3 Describes the enjoyment, self-expression, challenge, multiculturalism, and social benefits experienced by achieving one's best in physical activities. [3.4]
Recognize and evaluate the role of cooperation and positive interactions with others when participating in physical activity. [3.9]

Lesson

Review forehand and backhand drive. [1.1/1.2]

Lead students in a warm-up followed by aerobic exercise. 4.1 [2.2]

Have students, in pairs, practice dropping the ball and executing a backhand drive or forehand drive. (Assessment Opportunity: Structured Observation 1.0, 2.2, 2.4 [1.2, 1.3, 1.5]) 2.1, 5.2 [1.7, 3.1]

Have pairs, who are ready, practice tossing the ball to each other and executing a forehand or backhand drive. (Assessment Opportunity: Structured Observation 1.0, 2.2, 2.4 [1.2, 1.3, 1.5]) 2.1, 5.2 [1.7, 3.1]

Have pairs, who are ready, begin hitting back and forth to each other using a forehand or backhand drive. (Assessment Opportunity: Structured Observation 1.0, 2.2, 2.4 [1.2, 1.3, 1.5]) 2.1, 5.2 [1.7, 3.1]

Have pairs, who are ready, hit the ball back and forth using a forehand or backhand drive and count the number of hits they can make without missing. (Assessment Opportunity: Structured Observation 1.0, 2.2, 2.4 [1.2, 1.3, 1.5]) 2.1, 5.2 [1.7, 3.1]

Lead students in flexibility exercises and a cool-down. 4.1 [2.2]

Discuss feedback with students. 2.1 [1.7/1.9/3.5]

Feedback improves the learning of motor skills by providing error detection and motivation for the learner.
Feedback is based on the critical elements for each skill.
Only one or two corrections should be identified for feedback after each performance.
Feedback is delayed for a few seconds after the performance to give the performer an opportunity to reflect on his or her own performance.
Feedback is given when the performer cannot see the result of the performance (e.g., technique).
Feedback is not given when the performer can see the result of the performance (e.g., accuracy, speed, or distance).
Feedback is most helpful when it is specific and meaningful.
Feedback should be given frequently in the early stages of learning and then tapered off.

Have students respond to the following journal prompt: how have you maintained and create a physically and emotionally safe and non-threatening environment for tennis activities. (Assessment Opportunity: Journal Entry) 5.2 [3.1]